Woven Stainless Cloth, Computer/light interactive, 2000

Three 4'x8' scrims

 

The Sharon screens are based on the form of a Talit and function like a theatrical scrim. The viewer activated screens are front lit but when activated the front light dims and a rear light brightens revealing different scenes from Jewish history.
 

The first is a view of Mount Sinai, the second is Masada and the third is an image of the road to Jericho. The stainless steel with gold plated stainless steel mesh was chosen to honour other aspects of Jewish history and tradition. The first tabernacle or portable dwelling place was made of woven fabric signified by the mesh and the Talit is conceptually derived from this. Halakhah and Agadah reference the yin and yang of Jewish tradition, one signifying tales and lore and perhaps common sense as it meshes with the very formal legalistic component of rabbinic tradition. What was most interesting to me is the sometimes centuries old discussions and counter discussions amongst scholars and Rabbis that inform the fabric of these laws and rules and give the Jewish religion its strength.
 

Each screen is 4' x 8' and is made of woven stainless cloth with a gold plated hand braided fringe corresponding exactly to that on a Talit.
 

The intent was to communicate to elders no longer capable of verbal expression who might connect to remembered images. It has done so with great success. 
 

Sharon Screens (2000)

Woven Stainless Cloth, Computer/Light Interactive

Three 4'X8' scrims

Sharon Screens (2000)
Sharon Screens (2000)

press to zoom

press to zoom

press to zoom
Sharon Screens (2000)
Sharon Screens (2000)

press to zoom
1/4